Association of Food and Drug Officials
"Promoting Public Health, Fostering Uniformity, and Establishing Partnerships"
 
 

Blog


Blog

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • September 29, 2014 12:25 PM | Anonymous


    Agricultural Marketing Service

    USDA Appoints New Members to the National Organic Standards Board

                                                                          

    Federal Trade Commission

    FTC Approves Final Amendments to Guides to Help Businesses Comply with Law Regarding Promotional Allowances and Services


    Food and Drug Administration

    Human Food and Cosmetics Manufactured From, Processed With, or Otherwise Containing Material from Cattle

    FDA food safety challenge to spur new technologies for fighting foodborne illness

    FDA Seeks to Make FSMA Proposals More Flexible, Targeted

    Proposed Rule: Food for Animals, Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls

    Proposed Rule: Foreign Supplier Verification Programs for Importers of Food for Humans and Animals

    Proposed Rule: Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption


    Food and Nutrition Service

    Requests for Nominations: National Advisory Council on Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition                               

    Information and Guidance on the Domestic Beef Market

    Team Up for School Nutrition Success Initiative


    Food Safety and Inspection Service

    Rule: Changes in Accredited Laboratory Fees

    Rule: Electronic Import Inspection Application and Certification of Imported Products and Foreign Establishments: Public Health Information System and Import Inspection Regulations

                                                                        


  • September 29, 2014 11:56 AM | Anonymous


    Project Title: District and State Recall Cooperative Plan

    A critical component of an Integrated Food Safety System (IFSS) is enhancement and efficiency of communication between the US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other federal, state, local, tribal and territorial counterparts with overlapping jurisdiction during food related emergencies and recalls.  This project sought to determine the current state of, and barriers to, communication, as well as identify possible best practices to overcome these communication issues leading to greater efficiency in response to food emergencies. The PFP sponsored this project and completed it with the help of over 50 volunteers – both FDA and state, targeting the completion of Phase I (a Best Practice Recommendation paper) by the fall of 2014.

    OBJECTIVES:

    • Establish Points of Contact for recall and food emergencies in relevant jurisdictions, and methods of posting
    • Establish what, when and how information can/needs to be shared
    • Determine any training needs for food emergency and recall staff (Auditing)
    • Identify and share investigation documents to provide or collect at firms
    • Determine when and how FDA becomes involved in a State inspection/follow-up to a State identified recall of an FDA product (State positive sample of FDA regulated product)
    • Establish uniform communication procedures between FDA and States

    STATUS:

    • We have identified 22+ Best Practice Recommendations to enhance communication and sharing of information between partner agencies.
    • We are in the process of finalizing the best practices document and submitting it to the PFP Governing Council (GC).
    • We are looking to update regulatory partners on project outcomes in the near future possibly at venues such as the NCAFDO Conference in order to align with the GC’s strategic plan.

    NEXT STEPS:

    • Review the Best Practice Recommendations and determine if a new recall workgroup(s) need to be created to refine and further develop the recommendations.
    • If new workgroup projects are identified, write new recall project proposals for FY 2015 that align with the Governing Council’s strategic plan.
    • Reach out to other workgroups to determine if any of our Best Practice Recommendations would fit better under their workgroups.
    • Provide an update to this and the other PFP Response and Recall projects at the NCAFDO Conference in Cleveland, OH, on October 23, 2014.
  • September 29, 2014 11:44 AM | Anonymous

    April 28-30, 2015
    Baltimore Convention Center, MD


    Valuable Opportunities for Attendees
    • Educational sessions offering interactive solutions and tools that can be implemented immediately
    • Specialized training and certification courses to extend your food safety credentials
    • Industry solution providers demonstrating the latest tools and technologies on the Exhibit Hall floor
    • Unparallelled networking opportunities to collaborate with food safety professionals representing the entire supply chain 

    Questions?
    Catrisha Fisher
    Senior Registration Coordinator
    Ph: 847-405-4124
    fisherc@bnpmedia.com
  • September 29, 2014 11:40 AM | Anonymous

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is pleased to announce availability of the updated FD170 Course: Application of Inspection and Investigation Techniques.  The course was updated by the International Food Protection Training Institute (IFPTI) under a cooperative agreement grant.  It is designed to be instructor-led and provides states with the ability to supplement the course to meet their agency-specific needs. 

    Course Description for FD170:

    FD170: Application of Inspection and Investigation Techniques integrates the information from the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) University’s web-based training courses with interactive activities and exercises in a face-to-face setting. The course is designed to be the classroom component of entry-level food safety inspector training. Topics covered include: a review of prerequisite material: food safety laws and regulations; equipment and tools; hazard analysis; food safety inspection steps; investigations; sampling; and report writing.  This course typically spans three days. 

    Intended Audience:

    Entry-level state, local, tribal, and territorial regulatory officials in manufactured food and retail food programs.   This course may also be used as a refresher course for experienced inspectors.

    All course materials are available for download, including administrator, instructor, and participant guides, on the IFPTI’s learning management system website at http://www.ifpti.org/fd170 . The downloaded documents can be printed or used in electronic format during delivery. 

    Funding

    ·         State, local, tribal, and territorial Agencies may use their own funds to cover the cost of the FD170 course. 

    Funding Through the Office of Partnership (OP):

    The FDA Office of Partnerships (OP) also encourages grantees to request the use of cooperative agreement funds to cover the cost of FD170 training for their staff, including:

    ·         Manufactured Food Regulatory Program Standards (MFRPS) cooperative agreement 

    ·         Voluntary National Retail Food Regulatory Program Standards (VNRFRPS) cooperative agreement

    ·         Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO) Retail Program Standards Grant Program

    ·         Other OP cooperative agreement programs

    Allowable expenses may include intrastate travel for course participants, printing of materials, and meeting space.  Please contact your FDA Office of Acquisition and Grants Services (OAGS) Grants Management Specialist and OP Project Officer for more information on requesting funding for the FD170 Couse. 

    This message is being broadcast by ORA’s Division of Communications.

    Thank you,

    FDA/ORA

    Office of Communications and Quality Program Management/

    Division of Communications

    Mailbox:  DivComm-ORA@fda.hhs.gov


  • September 10, 2014 11:18 AM | Anonymous


    USA Jobs Announcement: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/379023200

    Job Announcement Number: FDA-ORA-14-SL-1195986

    The Office of Partnerships is announcing the vacancy position of Director of Office of Partnership.  This position reports to the Deputy Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs (DACRA), Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA), Office of Global Regulatory Operations and Policy (OGROP), within the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in Rockville, Maryland. 

    The incumbent serves as the Director, Office of Partnerships in the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) in the Office of Global Regulatory Operations and Policy (OGROP).  As the Director, the incumbent serves as the Senior Partnerships Program Officer, who will be a key member of the senior management team of the Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs (ACRA)/DACRA which has responsibilities for decision making processes and leads discussions and decision-making concerning ORA plans, programs, and activities, both during strategic planning sessions and in the actual determination, allocation, and administration of ORA program segments(s), functions, and activities.

    The incumbent provides expert advice and counsel concerning approaches and options that are sound and feasible in relation to ORA's regulatory goals and objectives.  As the Director, OP, the incumbent serves as the principal advisor to the ACRA/DACRA and is recognized as the person who can speak authoritatively for the ACRA/DACRA on matters pertaining to the FDA/ORA partnership programs.

    The incumbent represents the agency in meetings, conference, and committees involving policy and other matters pertinent to partnership programs; coordinates programs with State, local, and foreign governments and other Federal agencies concerning the interpretation of regulatory requirements, impacts, and other issues.

    The incumbent represents the ACRA/DACRA with State, local and foreign regulatory and scientific entities, providing strategic recommendations and facilitating the development of stronger working relationships and new cooperative agreements and partnerships.  Also represents the ACRA/DACRA in dealing with and negotiating with representatives of Congress; HHS Operating Divisions, other Federal agencies; State, local, and, at times, foreign governments; the regulated industry; professional and industry organizations; and public interest groups. 

    Oversees the implementation of new laws and regulations which impact the mission of ORA.  This includes responsibility for the initiation and implementation of new policies, systems, and procedures.

    The incumbent is responsible for analysis of the impact of proposed changes to Agency laws and regulations, policies, and procedures which affect the functions, program segment(s), and activities of ORA's HQ and field offices that are involved with partnership efforts.  Identifies changes and additions to the functions, program segment(s), and activities of ORA necessary to implement new legislation or regulations, and develops various scenarios for dealing with expansion or contraction of ORA functions, program segment(s), and activities in relation to partnership efforts.

    The incumbent oversees, monitors, evaluates and provides guidance on the effectiveness of all ORA partnership activities.  Provides guidance on matters which cannot be resolved at the local level and coordinates efforts amongst the various offices.

    Directs the staff of OP and is responsible for the technical and administrative supervision through subordinate supervisors and/or team leaders of all Office employees which includes planning, assigning, reviewing, and evaluating the work and performance of those supervisors (or team leaders) and employees.  The Office Director is recognized as the authority in the functions, and activities of OP.

  • September 02, 2014 11:01 AM | Anonymous


    Agricultural Marketing Service

    Notice: United States Standard of Identity for Honey

    Rule: Decreased Assessment Rates: Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA

    Rule: Irish Potatoes Grown in Washington: Handling Regulations for Yellow Fleshed and White Types of Potatoes

    Federal Trade Commission

    Proposed Rule: Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule: AgeCheq Application for Parental Consent Method

    Food and Drug Administration

    Notice: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals: Channels of Trade Policy for Commodities With Residues of Pesticide Chemicals, etc

    Notice: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals:

    Temporary Marketing Permit Applications

    Notice: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals:

    Third Party Disclosure and Recordkeeping Requirements for Reportable Food

    Charter Renewals: Advisory Committees

    Meeting: Codex Alimentarius Commission Committee on Food Labeling

    Proposed Rules: Food Additives; Petitions: Richard C. Theuer; Withdrawal

    Food and Nutrition Service

    Notice: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals: User Access Request Form

    Food Safety and Inspection Service

    Back-To-School Food Safety Tips for Parents

    Special Alert: FSIS Releases Revised Guidance concerning Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) Sampling in Beef Manufacturing Trimmings and STEC Sampled and Tested Claims for Beef Manufacturing Trimmings

    FSIS Compliance Guideline for Training Establishment Carcass Sorters in the New Poultry Inspection System

    Notice: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals: Application for Inspection, Accreditation of Laboratories, and Exemptions

    Government Accountability Office

    Enhanced Detection Tools and Reporting Could Improve Efforts to Combat Recipient Fraud                                                             


  • August 18, 2014 1:53 PM | Anonymous

    Courtesy: CFSAN Constituent Update, August 5, 2014 Ed.

    As of today, all foods labeled gluten-free must meet all requirements of the gluten-free labeling final rule published in August 2013.

    The requirements apply to packaged foods labeled on or after today. FDA recognizes that many foods currently labeled as gluten-free may already meet the new federal definition. However, consumers should be aware that there may be some products still on store shelves that were produced and labeled before the compliance date for FDA’s rule.

    Today’s compliance date was established in the final rule one year ago to allow the food industry sufficient time to make changes needed in the formulation or labeling of their foods that voluntarily bear a gluten-free claim in the United States.

    The final rule provides a uniform standard definition to help consumers with celiac disease manage a gluten-free diet. Gluten-free foods must contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) gluten. Foods may be labeled “gluten-free” if they are inherently gluten free; or do not contain an ingredient that is: 1) a gluten-containing grain (e.g., spelt wheat); 2) derived from a gluten-containing grain that has not been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat flour); or 3) derived from a gluten-containing grain that has been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat starch), if the use of that ingredient results in the presence of 20 ppm or more gluten in the food.

    On June 25, 2014, the FDA issued a guide for small food businesses to help them comply with the final rule's requirements. FDA will continue to work with, educate and monitor industry on the use of the gluten-free claim.

    Outreach will be conducted to assist the industry, as needed, to ensure that the provisions of the rule are fully understood. In addition, FDA will use its existing compliance and enforcement tools, such as inspection, laboratory analysis, warning letters, seizure, and injunction, to ensure that the use of the claim on food packages complies with the definition.

    FDA recognizes that people with celiac disease are also interested in being able to identify gluten free foods served in restaurants and other retail establishments that serve prepared foods to customers. The gluten-free final rule applies to packaged foods, which may be sold in some retail and food-service establishments such as some carry-out restaurants. Given the public health significance of “gluten-free” labeling, FDA says that restaurants and other establishments making a gluten-free claim on their menus should be consistent with FDA’s definition. State and local governments play an important role in oversight of these establishments.

    We look forward to working with the states, the restaurant industry and other stakeholders to support education and outreach on the appropriate use of the term gluten-free.

    For additional information: www.fda.gov/gluten-freelabeling

    As of today, all foods labeled gluten-free must meet all requirements of the gluten-free labeling final rulepublished in August 2013.

    The requirements apply to packaged foods labeled on or after today. FDA recognizes that many foods currently labeled as gluten-free may already meet the new federal definition.  However, consumers should be aware that there may be some products still on store shelves that were produced and labeled before the compliance date for FDA’s rule.

    Today’s compliance date was established in the final rule one year ago to allow the food industry sufficient time to make changes needed in the formulation or labeling of their foods that voluntarily bear a gluten-free claim in the United States.

    The final rule provides a uniform standard definition to help consumers with celiac disease manage a gluten-free diet.  Gluten-free foods must contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) gluten. Foods may be labeled “gluten-free” if they are inherently gluten free; or do not contain an ingredient that is: 1) a gluten-containing grain (e.g., spelt wheat); 2) derived from a gluten-containing grain that has not been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat flour); or 3) derived from a gluten-containing grain that has been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat starch), if the use of that ingredient results in the presence of 20 ppm or more gluten in the food.

    On June 25, 2014, the FDA issued a guide for small food businesses to help them comply with the final rule's requirements.  FDA will continue to work with, educate and monitor industry on the use of the gluten-free claim.

    Outreach will be conducted to assist the industry, as needed, to ensure that the provisions of the rule are fully understood.  In addition, FDA will use its existing compliance and enforcement tools, such as inspection, laboratory analysis, warning letters, seizure, and injunction, to ensure that the use of the claim on food packages complies with the definition.

    FDA recognizes that people with celiac disease are also interested in being able to identify gluten free foods served in restaurants and other retail establishments that serve prepared foods to customers. The gluten-free final rule applies to packaged foods, which may be sold in some retail and food-service establishments such as some carry-out restaurants. Given the public health significance of “gluten-free” labeling, FDA says that restaurants and other establishments making a gluten-free claim on their menus should be consistent with FDA’s definition.  State and local governments play an important role in oversight of these establishments.

    We look forward to working with the states, the restaurant industry and other stakeholders to support education and outreach on the appropriate use of the term gluten-free.

    For additional information: www.fda.gov/gluten-freelabeling

    As of today, all foods labeled gluten-free must meet all requirements of the gluten-free labeling final rulepublished in August 2013.

    The requirements apply to packaged foods labeled on or after today. FDA recognizes that many foods currently labeled as gluten-free may already meet the new federal definition.  However, consumers should be aware that there may be some products still on store shelves that were produced and labeled before the compliance date for FDA’s rule.

    Today’s compliance date was established in the final rule one year ago to allow the food industry sufficient time to make changes needed in the formulation or labeling of their foods that voluntarily bear a gluten-free claim in the United States.

    The final rule provides a uniform standard definition to help consumers with celiac disease manage a gluten-free diet.  Gluten-free foods must contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) gluten. Foods may be labeled “gluten-free” if they are inherently gluten free; or do not contain an ingredient that is: 1) a gluten-containing grain (e.g., spelt wheat); 2) derived from a gluten-containing grain that has not been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat flour); or 3) derived from a gluten-containing grain that has been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat starch), if the use of that ingredient results in the presence of 20 ppm or more gluten in the food.

    On June 25, 2014, the FDA issued a guide for small food businesses to help them comply with the final rule's requirements.  FDA will continue to work with, educate and monitor industry on the use of the gluten-free claim.

    Outreach will be conducted to assist the industry, as needed, to ensure that the provisions of the rule are fully understood.  In addition, FDA will use its existing compliance and enforcement tools, such as inspection, laboratory analysis, warning letters, seizure, and injunction, to ensure that the use of the claim on food packages complies with the definition.

    FDA recognizes that people with celiac disease are also interested in being able to identify gluten free foods served in restaurants and other retail establishments that serve prepared foods to customers. The gluten-free final rule applies to packaged foods, which may be sold in some retail and food-service establishments such as some carry-out restaurants. Given the public health significance of “gluten-free” labeling, FDA says that restaurants and other establishments making a gluten-free claim on their menus should be consistent with FDA’s definition.  State and local governments play an important role in oversight of these establishments.

    We look forward to working with the states, the restaurant industry and other stakeholders to support education and outreach on the appropriate use of the term gluten-free.

    For additional information: www.fda.gov/gluten-freelabeling

  • August 18, 2014 1:39 PM | Anonymous


    Courtesy: USDA Constituent Update, August 8, 2014 Ed.

    View Revised Guidelines

    FSIS issued a revised compliance guideline this month called, “FSIS Compliance Guideline for Meat and Poultry Jerky Produced by Small and Very Small Establishments.” The purpose of the guideline is to assist establishments in meeting FSIS regulations related to jerky processing. The guideline also contains recommendations to help industry produce a safe product based on the scientific information available in the literature.

    FSIS has updated the guideline based on comments received on the July 2012 version. FSIS also updated the guideline based on AskFSIS questions received. Changes made to the guideline include the addition of a surface preparation step in the step-by-step guide on jerky processing, clarification of the definition of shelf-stability and recommended shelf-stability parameters, and clarification of the documentation that establishments should collect to support that their process effectively addresses hazards. A detailed summary of the comments and FSIS’ responses can be found in the document.

    FSIS encourages small and very small meat and poultry establishments that manufacture these products to avail themselves of this guideline. FSIS has posted this compliance guideline on its Compliance Guides Index webpage at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/regulatory-compliance/compliance-guides-index.

    Questions on the revised compliance guideline and directive can be submitted through AskFSIS.

    FSIS issued a revised compliance guideline this month called, “FSIS Compliance Guideline for Meat and Poultry Jerky Produced by Small and Very Small Establishments.” The purpose of the guideline is to assist establishments in meeting FSIS regulations related to jerky processing. The guideline also contains recommendations to help industry produce a safe product based on the scientific information available in the literature.

    FSIS has updated the guideline based on comments received on the July 2012 version. FSIS also updated the guideline based on AskFSIS questions received. Changes made to the guideline include the addition of a surface preparation step in the step-by-step guide on jerky processing, clarification of the definition of shelf-stability and recommended shelf-stability parameters, and clarification of the documentation that establishments should collect to support that their process effectively addresses hazards. A detailed summary of the comments and FSIS’ responses can be found in the document.

    FSIS encourages small and very small meat and poultry establishments that manufacture these products to avail themselves of this guideline. FSIS has posted this compliance guideline on its Compliance Guides Index webpage athttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/regulatory-compliance/compliance-guides-index.

    Questions on the revised compliance guideline and directive can be submitted through AskFSIS.

    FSIS issued a revised compliance guideline this month called, “FSIS Compliance Guideline for Meat and Poultry Jerky Produced by Small and Very Small Establishments.” The purpose of the guideline is to assist establishments in meeting FSIS regulations related to jerky processing. The guideline also contains recommendations to help industry produce a safe product based on the scientific information available in the literature.

    FSIS has updated the guideline based on comments received on the July 2012 version. FSIS also updated the guideline based on AskFSIS questions received. Changes made to the guideline include the addition of a surface preparation step in the step-by-step guide on jerky processing, clarification of the definition of shelf-stability and recommended shelf-stability parameters, and clarification of the documentation that establishments should collect to support that their process effectively addresses hazards. A detailed summary of the comments and FSIS’ responses can be found in the document.

    FSIS encourages small and very small meat and poultry establishments that manufacture these products to avail themselves of this guideline. FSIS has posted this compliance guideline on its Compliance Guides Index webpage athttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/regulatory-compliance/compliance-guides-index.

    Questions on the revised compliance guideline and directive can be submitted through AskFSIS.

  • August 18, 2014 12:30 PM | Anonymous


    Courtesy: NCAFDO, The Informer Newsletter, August 2014 Ed.

    Our next NCAFDO Annual Education Conference is being finalized at this time; we will be in Cleveland, Ohio thanks to Lowell Lufkin and Terry Gerhardt’s work on setting it up. The Westin Cleveland Downtown and the Ohio Department of Agriculture will be our hosts. The dates for the conference are Monday, October 20 to Thursday, October 23, 2014. A workshop on labeling is organized for Monday and Tuesday morning and will focus on small processors and local health agencies. The official start of the conference is at noon on Tuesday and will wrap up by noon on Thursday.

    Lowell’s site visit confirms the hotel remodel was very successful and it will provide an excellent venue for the conference. The hotel is located downtown within walking distance of assorted restaurants and shops with access to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,baseball, and Severance Hall for those of us who like classical music. I have attended a couple conferences in downtown Cleveland and had a great time with both food, cultural opportunities and just enjoying the city. If you do fly in, there is public transit from the airport to downtown and a short walk of a few blocks to the hotel, along with the standard taxi and other options.

    We have also been working on our small conference grant to support attendance to the conference, and while we don’t have final confirmation from the Food and Drug Administration on its renewal, we do anticipate it should be renewed. The small conference grant is meant to support the attendance and education of regulatory officials at regional food safety training opportunities. Look for more details on our web site as they become available, or contact your state representative to NCAFDO.

    We are working on the program and will focus a bit
    on Listeria Monocytogenes (Lm):
    • The latest science and research in both the retail
    and wholesale food worlds;
    • How to develop and implement an effective
    sanitation program for the control of Lm; and,
    • How the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA)
    will affect these plans and facilities.

    Additionally, there will be updates on FSMA from our federal partners and any participants on the FDA implementation teams. So please save the dates and plan on attending. Looking forward to seeing you in Cleveland.

    Byron Beerbower
    NCAFDO President
<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 

Copyright © 2013 Association of Food and Drug Officials.  All Rights Reserved.
Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software